GENOTYPE TESTING

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Sharmin:
I encourage everyone to have genotype testing done for their child - if your child is newly diagnosed it is a great time to have it done before they are transfused (or transfused too many times). 

This is the only way to protect your child from making multiple antibodies, and make the cross matching process easier.  This step can aid in preventing complications in the future.  It can also prevent transfusion reactions and antibody related hemolysis. 

Please speak with your doctors about it - there are several places in the world where this testing can be done, blood samples can be taken and sent to these locations.  Please have your blood bank inquire about where and how these samples are to be collected, stored and sent. 

Treatment is getting much better these days, please try to avoid unnecessary complications by doing this testing!!

Best of luck everyone, 

Sharmin

Manal:
Sharmin, i thought genotyping is the cross match test :huh :huh

I do not know whether we do it here in my country or not. I was told that if i want to transfuse my son one day, only cross matching is required. Thanks for this post

manal

Sharmin:
Manal,

From my understanding, the cross match process involves testing the recipients blood with a number of antigens and known irritants to determine which antigens the blood reacts with.  The donor blood is then tested for these antigens, and the compatible donor will, along with being a blood type match for the recipient, will not have have the antigens that the the recipient blood sample reacted with.  This is the common procedure used before blood transfusions and generally works very well. 

Children who receive multiple transfusions may over time develop sensitivity to certain antigens in foreign blood, and may begin have reactions to them or developing antibodies to antigens in foreign blood. 

Genotype testing entails testing to genetically find what antigens the recipient actually has, and also to determine the antigens which are absent.  This information is then used during the crossmatch process, thereby the donor and recipient are more closely matched on many levels.  This reduces the likelihood of reactions and antibody related hemolysis.  The recipient's body is likely to recognize the donor blood as it's own - because it is so closely matched.    This can also make finding a match much easier, because the blood bank will already know which antigens that the recipient has - therefore they do not need to be tested for in finding suitable donor blood. 

I think that this is a bit of an oversimplification - and perhaps a little incomplete - perhaps Andy can add to it. 

I believe that my son would have been much less likely to develop the antibodies he did if we had taken this step beforehand. 
I urge everyone to please find out where their child's blood sample can be sent to have these tests done.  It is possible for doctors to send blood samples to other countries.  My son's blood is being tested in Toronto for genotyping. 

Please see this thread for more information about genotype testing:

http://www.thalassemiapatientsandfriends.com/index.php?topic=1660.0;highlight=genotype+testing+sharmin

Sharmin

Manal:
Sharmin,  thanks for the explaination :hugfriend

But again if these tests are not available, is it okay to have washed, filtered and irradiated blood. What do we get rid of when we irradiate blood, viruses & bacteria or antigens????????

manal

Sharmin:
Manal,

Washed blood cells reduce some of the exposure, but you can still have reactions.  Also, red cells can be damaged during the process by which they are washed so the blood does not last as long - and you are still getting the same amount of iron.

I don't think that there is a substitute for finding a compatible donor - and genotype matching is the best method.  I can try to find out where you can have this testing so you can arrange to have this done now - just in case - even if you never need it. 

Sharmin

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