• Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
    October 25, 2014, 05:09:41 AM

  • Login with username, password and session length

Sajid's dove

Tell everyone they can now find this site by typing this into their browser:

thalpal.com

If you are interested in visiting Lisa's previous (MSN) forum, it will still be available for viewing at: http://thalpal1.multiply.com/ /ThalassemiaPatientsandFriends



If you have any problems registering or signing in, please send an email to: andy@thalpal.com
Please do not send questions about thalassemia to this address.


Administrators
Andy
Danielle

Thalassemia Patients and Friends and thalpal © A. Battaglia 2013





49036 Posts in 5117 Topics by 4648 Members
Latest Member: redman0003

Forum Tip: 
You can change your member name in your profile, under "Account Related Settings," so you don't have to re-register to change it.
« previous next »
Pages: 1 2 » Go Down Print
Author Topic: what happens after you get your spleen taken out?  (Read 27029 times)
SoonToBeWife
New Member
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 3


« on: July 01, 2006, 12:32:33 AM »

My Fiance has Thal Major, He has one gene. I Love him so much, just because he has this doesn't stop me from loving him. I don't have Thal. A couple of years ago he had his spleen taken out. What happens after you get your spleen taken out? I'm just still confused. How is your health like before and after you get your spleen taken out? is it really different? What's your diet? (cause I'm confused how to feed him haha...and he doesn't like to talk about it often so I have to turn to other things) Do you still have to look at Iron Content when eating? Taking out your spleen does it mean that you're Iron levels are normal? Or what does it mean? Are transfusions still needed? And what kind of food do you eat after you get your spleen taken out? After you spleen comes out, do things change alot with your health? I know that after you get it out, you're basically on medication for the rest of your life, but is that it? What else happens? If someone could answer some or better all of these questions, that'd be greatly appreciated. Thank you everyone and Have a Great day! Oh yes and one more thing, is there a machine of any kind that can check your iron levels? I heard there was one, I think there's one but I don't know what it's called or where I can get it. I know these are alot of questions. Can anyone help me please? Thanks everyone! I love the Forum! =D
Logged
§ãJ¡Ð ساجد
Beta Thal Major
Global Moderator
Supreme Member
*****
Offline Offline

Location: Pakistan - راولپنڈی

Gender: Male
Posts: 1991


اَسّلامُ علیکم Peace be Upon you


WWW
« Reply #1 on: July 01, 2006, 01:01:35 AM »

Well, basically spleen acts like a filter that removes dead and damaged blood cells along with other gunk in the blood.

Since Thals. live on transfusions, there is an extra load of dead red cells which eventually accumulates in the spleen. If the excess iron is not removed; this causes spleen to enlarge and malfunction and eventually it starts to destroy all cells even those that have the life span to continue on. Thus the doctors decide to remove the troublesome organ.

After it has been removed, the body is prone to infections as the spleen also removes infectious/damaged cells and thus the patient has to live on constant antibiotics etc. to cope with the infections.

The story does not end here as the body still requires blood and Thals. can't make their own. So the blood TransX continues and this time it is more risky that the spleen is out, and the dying cells start to accumulate elsewhere such as liver, heart and kidneys etc.

So even with the spleen out, you have to be serious with your iron chelation. Make sure you don't take iron in your diet.

As far as the machine that measures iron (or serum ferritin) in the blood is expensive and is only used in the labs. You just have to have your doctor prescribe the blood test and the hospital or your local lab will take care of the rest.

Please feel free to ask any more questions on your mind.
Logged

اَسّلامُ علیکم Peace be Upon you
§ãJ¡Ð ®âµƒ
Web Site
§ãJ¡Ð ساجد
Beta Thal Major
Global Moderator
Supreme Member
*****
Offline Offline

Location: Pakistan - راولپنڈی

Gender: Male
Posts: 1991


اَسّلامُ علیکم Peace be Upon you


WWW
« Reply #2 on: July 01, 2006, 01:40:23 AM »

After reading your post in another forum I would like to add something here too:

the increase in the interval of blood TransX is due to the removal of the faulty spleen. For example with the bad spleen you had to go for TransX every other day as the spleen destroys the normal Red blood cells too. But when you take out the troubled organ then the interval increases to 2-3 weeks. This is the case for Thal Major. But if your significant other has Thal. minor or intermedia rather than Thal. major and his TransX has been totally stopped after splenectomy; then it is possible that being Thal. intermedia makes enough blood to prevent getting blood transfusion.
« Last Edit: August 10, 2006, 11:41:54 PM by §ãJ¡Ð ®âµƒ » Logged

اَسّلامُ علیکم Peace be Upon you
§ãJ¡Ð ®âµƒ
Web Site
Andy
Administrator
Supreme Member
*****
Offline Offline

Location: In my heart, Maldives

Gender: Male
Posts: 6971


Will thal rule you or will you rule thal?


« Reply #3 on: July 01, 2006, 11:37:38 AM »

Is your fiance getting regular transfusions? If the spleen was removed and he no longer transfuses then he would be classified thal intermedia and not major. If your fiance has only one thal gene it is impossible for him to be major, but in some cases one gene can lead to an intermedia condition.

The spleen removes any blood cells that are old, misformed and even transfused red cells which it views as invaders (similar to transplant rejection). With intermedia, iron overloading from diet can be a serious problem, so dietary iron should be kept low. Drinking tea with meals is recommended to reduce iron absorption from foods. The medication required after splenectomy is usually no more than a daily dose of penicillin. Things can change after splenectomy as the spleen is part of the immune system and without it, one is more susceptible to infection. Infections must be taken seriously and treated promptly.

I have never heard of a machine to test iron levels. Has anyone else heard of this?
Logged

Andy

All we are saying is give thals a chance.
Nur
Junior Member
***
Offline Offline

Location: Malaysia

Gender: Female
Posts: 159



« Reply #4 on: August 01, 2006, 02:56:08 AM »

Hi all,

A good question by SoonToBeWife. I have not taken out my spleen yet and I am 31 years old. My doctors have asked me to take it out occasionally but i refuse. I sometimes wonder if my decision is right or not but to me, it seems that I have no problem with it yet.

But since I have my first child I have noticed that I required blood transfusion a bit more frequently. Usually I went to the hospital for transfusion every 4 weeks but after delivering my baby, I need to have transfusion every 2-3 weeks. Does this means I need to take out my spleen? other than that, I don't have any other problems.

I often wonder how my life going to be if this is really what i have to face. Will I be able to have another child?, will I be able to live more energetic? or maybe my life will turn to a much worse condition after the spleen is removed. I know this is a normal thing for Thals. Most of them who have done it says it no big deal but I really need a sincere answer. Most of them are in their early 20's and not married. Maybe their situation is different than I am, a 31 yers old Thal Major with a daughter. Plus, how do i know if I'm receiving a proper post-operation treatment.   


 
Nur
Logged
Shikha Mitra
Junior Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 109


« Reply #5 on: August 01, 2006, 12:48:35 PM »

 Hi
My daughter is now 30 years old. She is E-beta thal, which is Thal major. She had her spleen removed when she was 21. Since then her transfusions frequency is every 4-5 weeks. earlier it was every 10-15 days all though her growing years till the spleen was removed.
They say that the spleen does not have any major function after a certain age. Nowadays you have lifetime vaccines to protect you  from any infections, and after splenectomy you really dont need to take Penicillin all your life as earlier.
My daughter has had no problems what so ever till now, neither any big infection.And it is 9 years since her splenectomy and she leads a healthy normal life.
If your speen is giving trouble, then maybe your doctors will advise you to take it out. These days it is a simple proceedure and can be done by laproscopy.
Taking out the spleen will hardly effect  having another child or you being 31 and married.
Infact, splenectomy could make you feel better and you might need less blood.
But ofcourse. all this is for your doctor to decide.

Shikha
Logged
Nur
Junior Member
***
Offline Offline

Location: Malaysia

Gender: Female
Posts: 159



« Reply #6 on: August 01, 2006, 10:43:54 PM »

Dear Shikha,

Thanks for your lovely feedback. Although I am still having doubts but i'm felling a bit better about the whole matter. I did not know that the spleen had a 'time limit' before. At about what age does it start to loose its capabality to perform effectively? I can't imagine it done by laproscopy though. I don't think it is availale here.

I do hope if I were to take out my spleen i would feel much better and the frequency of my transfusion would improve.

Nur
Logged
Poirot
Senior Member
****
Offline Offline

Location: India

Gender: Male
Posts: 382


« Reply #7 on: August 02, 2006, 05:24:32 AM »

Hi Nur,

I had my spleen taken out at the age of 17. It was very enlarged and the doctors were afraid that it could get accidently ruptured by falling down badly or while playing soccer, etc. My Hb prior to removal of spleen used to hover around 7.0-7.5 gms/dl. Post removal, it went up to 9.0-9.5 gms. Now, it remains around 8.5-9.0 gms. These comparisons are all with transfusions, and over same time gaps.

I had taken the Pneumo.... vaccine before the surgery. Post surgery, I have been taking 125mg of oral pennicillin on a daily basis, for the last 19 yrs. I have not really been plagued by any more infections after the splenectomy, than before. However, I did feel very energised post-splenectomy, as if a big weight had been rolled off me, which it had literally too (the spleen weighed some 2.4 kgs, if i remember correctly!!!).

Hope that is useful.

Poirot
Logged
Nur
Junior Member
***
Offline Offline

Location: Malaysia

Gender: Female
Posts: 159



« Reply #8 on: August 02, 2006, 11:28:23 PM »

Dear Poirot,

you seem to be doing well. I hope i have the luck like you do. your story is pretty much like my younger brother. only he did the oeration for about two years ago. he is now 24 years old
Logged
Poirot
Senior Member
****
Offline Offline

Location: India

Gender: Male
Posts: 382


« Reply #9 on: August 02, 2006, 11:55:14 PM »

I hope i have the luck like you do. your story is pretty much like my younger brother. only he did the oeration for about two years ago. he is now 24 years old

I wish you my luck then, Nur!

BTW, did your brother's HB improve post splenectomy? And, did he feel more energised? Was his spleen more enlarged than yours?

Take care now,

Poirot
Logged
Nur
Junior Member
***
Offline Offline

Location: Malaysia

Gender: Female
Posts: 159



« Reply #10 on: August 03, 2006, 10:35:54 PM »

Dear Poirot,

my brother went for transfusion for 4 weeks before splenectomy and after that he can manage to have his transfusin once in every 2-3 month. He is pretty much the same energetic before and after the operation but we noticed that he is easily cathing a cold, flu or fever and it is hard for him to recover from it. He have to take out the spleen because he has a high Platelet or WBC count, I don't remember which...
Logged
Poirot
Senior Member
****
Offline Offline

Location: India

Gender: Male
Posts: 382


« Reply #11 on: August 05, 2006, 12:39:31 AM »

but we noticed that he is easily cathing a cold, flu or fever and it is hard for him to recover from it. He have to take out the spleen because he has a high Platelet or WBC count, I don't remember which...

Nur,

He should check with his doctor about whether he should be on something like oral penicillin, as a preventive measure and to boost his immune system. Catching minor infections so often could lead to more serious complications.


Poirot
Logged
Nur
Junior Member
***
Offline Offline

Location: Malaysia

Gender: Female
Posts: 159



« Reply #12 on: August 07, 2006, 10:58:21 PM »

Poirot,

My brother has been taking the oral penicilin. I don't know there is other option than to take it orally.

Btw..How large was your spleen before you take it out? What tests should I do before I decide wether or not to have a splenectomy?


Nur
Logged
Poirot
Senior Member
****
Offline Offline

Location: India

Gender: Male
Posts: 382


« Reply #13 on: August 11, 2006, 08:16:56 AM »

Poirot,
My brother has been taking the oral penicilin. I don't know there is other option than to take it orally.
Btw..How large was your spleen before you take it out? What tests should I do before I decide wether or not to have a splenectomy?
Nur

Actually, there is an alternative to oral penicillin .... it is shots aka injections!!!!

My spleen was pretty large, I don't remember the dimensions, but it weighed over 2.5 kgs. And, this for an organ that is supposed to smaller than your fist size. When I had the spleen, if I was a girl, I sure could have been mistaken for 6 mths pregnant.  ...... anyway, I was so happy to have it out, although they did an open pit surgery (my terms!) to take it out.

Take care,

Poirot
Logged
olivia
New Member
*
Offline Offline

Location: Malaysia

Gender: Female
Posts: 12


« Reply #14 on: August 25, 2006, 09:09:47 AM »

Just wanna share my experience on this topic. I've had my spleen removed 3 yrs ago using laproscopic technic. It was enlarged that time but I can still go without removing it. Coincidently at that moment, specialist doctors in laproscopic from aus and japan came down to show and train the local doctors on this new tecnics, so my doc put me in for this trial (guess I'm the guinea pig!! Grin and I still remember the Japanese doctor told me I'll lost a few kg cos he's gonna help me remove some fats too  )
Before the operation, my Hb was always hovering around 6-7 which is quite bad for me but after removing my spleen, now it's always at the level 9-10 but I still have to continue my monthly transfusion. I'm now on penicilin and so far, I dont have any complications after the operation.
Logged
Pages: 1 2 » Go Up Print 
« previous next »
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.20 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!