• Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
    December 11, 2019, 09:56:55 PM

  • Login with username, password and session length

Sajid's dove

Tell everyone they can now find this site by typing this into their browser:

thalpal.com

Click to visit us on Facebook


If you have any problems registering or signing in, please send an email to: andythalpal@yahoo.com
Please do not send questions about thalassemia to this address.


Administrators
Andy
Danielle

Thalassemia Patients and Friends and thalpal © A. Battaglia 2019





55167 Posts in 5879 Topics by 6158 Members
Latest Member: mohamohy

Forum Tip: 
You can change your member name in your profile, under "Account Related Settings," so you don't have to re-register to change it.
« previous next »
Pages: 1 Go Down Print
Author Topic: Long Term Use of Hydroxyurea In Patients with β-Thalassemia In Southern Ira  (Read 4365 times)
Akita
New Member
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 16


« on: December 18, 2010, 01:27:08 PM »

On the this year Conference of the American Society of Hematology there were also presented studies for thalassemia. I was not there, but could read some abstract in the register

http://ash.confex.com/ash/2010/webprogram/start.html

One of these abstracts is about 13 years long term use of hydroxyurea in Southern Iran.

Two hundred patients participated with a mean age of 21 plus/minus 7, from 5 - 40 years old. There were formed two groups of patients:

Group 1: 142 transfusion-dependent thalassemia major patients after the age of two.

Group 2: 57 thalassemia - intermediate patients without any history of blood transfusion or long interval transfusion.

The mean dose of HU/Hydroxyura was 9.9±2 mg/kg/day, range of 8-15mg/kg/day.

Response to HU was defined as increasing Hb level at least 1g/dl after 3 months of starting HU and/or decrease or cessation of the need for blood transfusion.

'Results:

Group 1: 101 patients became transfusion-free,
28 patients needed 1-4 transfusions per year
14 patients did not response and were excluded from the study.

Group 2: All patents were completely transfusion-free with acceptable Hb level at the end of the study.

"So HU could be a safe alternative to blood transfusion in transfusion-dependent β-thalassemia patients after age of 2 or help to increase Hb level in untransfused TI patients."

For the details of the study and the tables with the mutations please see the abstract.

Regards Margarete

-------------------------------------------------------

http://ash.confex.com/ash/2010/webprogram/Paper29784.html


2061 Long Term Use of Hydroxyurea In Patients with β-Thalassemia In Southern Iran
Oral and Poster Abstracts
Poster Session: Thalassemia and Globin Gene Regulation: Poster I
Saturday, December 4, 2010, 5:30 PM-7:30 PM
Hall A3/A4 (Orange County Convention Center)
Poster Board I-1041

Mehran Karimi, MD1*, Sezaneh Haghpanah2*, Majid Yavarian2*, Ali Farhadi1*, Abdolreza Afrasiabi2*, Mina Izadyar, MD3 and Behrang Samadi, MD4*

1Pediatric, Hematology Research Center, Shiraz, Iran
2Hematology Research Center, Shiraz, Iran
3Pediatric Medical center, Tehran, Iran
4NOVARTIS, Tehran, Tehran, Iran
Introduction: Hydroxyurea(HU) is an antimetabolite agent that also promotes production of fetal hemoglobin (HbF). Reports on the use of HU in patients with thalassemia major (TM) have revealed a reduction in blood transfusion dependency. Due to lesser α/β globin imbalance in thalassemia intermedia (TI) compared with TM, better clinical responses are expected in patients with TI. This study was undertaken to evaluate hematological and clinical responses of patients with β-thalassemia to HU therapy as well as adverse effects of HU and Beta globin gene mutations of patients in a period of thirteen years in southern Iran. Methods: Two hundred patients; mean age of 21±7, ranged from 5 to 40 years enrolled in this study. Patients divided into two groups. Group 1 consisted of 143 transfusion-dependent thalassemia patients after age of two. Group 2 consisted of 57 TI patients without any history of blood transfusion or long interval transfusion. Mean dose of HU was 9.9±2 mg/kg/day, range of 8-15mg/kg/day. Response to HU was defined as increasing Hb level at least 1g/dl after 3 months of starting HU and/or decrease or cessation of the need for blood transfusion. Investigated variables included Hb, MCV, MCH, HbF, and HbA1 in laboratory results as well as spleen size, energy state, facial changes (head circumference), and the need for blood transfusion in clinical findings. The patients were followed by Hb electrophoresis, Complete Blood Count, serum ferritin and chemistry panel in appropriate intervals. The assessment of adverse effects in patients was conducted by pediatric hematologists. Genomic DNA extracted from peripheral leukocyte by Giagen DNA extraction kit. Beta globin gene mutations were determined by ARMS based PCR and confirmed by sequencing. XmnI polymorphism at -153 gG after PCR, was characterized by RFLP method and electrophoresis on 2% agarose. Statistical analysis was done by SPSS v. 15 using student' t-test, paired t-test, and chi square test. Results: Of the 143 patients in group 1who were transfusion-dependent, 101 patients became transfusion-free and 28of them needed 1-4 transfusions per year. In this group, 14 patients had no response to HU and excluded from the study. All of the patients in group 2 were completely transfusion-free with acceptable Hb level at the end of study. Overall the mean Hb level of the patients after HU therapy was (9.4± 1.3). Exercise tolerance increased in 97% of the patients. No significant facial changes were observed in the patients at the end of study. From 73 non splenectomized patients, 83% had no change in spleen size. Adverse effects of HU were recorded in 44 of 200 patients. The most common side effects were dermatologic adverse effects followed by neurological and gastrointestinal side effects. Hematological malignancy and toxicity or any sign of bone marrow suppression were not observed in the patients during HU therapy. The presence of adverse effects in patients significantly increased by increasing age (p<0.001) and splenectomy (p< 0.05). But it had no significant relationship with sex, HU dose, or duration of treatment (p>0.05). Up to now, the frequency of beta globin gene mutations and XmnI polymorphism in 150 patients has been characterized (Tables 1 and 2). The most frequent beta globin gene mutation and XmnI polymorphism in our patients were homo IVS II-1(40.6%) and +/+ (59%) respectively.  Conclusion: In our study HU was effective for decreasing or cessation the need of regular blood transfusion as well as increasing Hb level in β-thalassemia patients. Also all of the patients could tolerate low-dose treatment with HU in this period without any major side effects. So HU could be a safe alternative to blood transfusion in transfusion-dependent β-thalassemia patients after age of 2 or help to increase Hb level in untransfused TI patients.

Table 1: Frequency of beta globin gene mutations in 150 β-thalassemia patients who treated with hydroxyurea

No.
   

Beta globin genotype

61
   

homo IVS II-1

3
   

IVS II-1/ cd39

8
   

IVS II-1/ cd82/83

14
   

IVS II-1/ cd-88

10
   

IVS II-1/ IVS I-5(G>C)

3
   

IVS II-1/ IVS I-(-1)(G>C)

8
   

IVS II-1/ IVS I-110

12
   

homo IVS I-5(G>C)

2
   

IVS I-5(G>C)/-88

14
   

IVS I-5(G>C)/IVS I-110

3
   

IVS I-5(G>C)/cd6

6
   

homo cd6

2
   

homo -93

3
   

homo cd39

1
   

homo cd41/42

Table 2: Frequency of -153 gG XmnI polymorphism in 150 β-thalassemia patients who treated with hydroxyurea

  -/-
   

-/+
   

+/+
   

XmnI Genotype

7(5%)
   

54(36%)
   

89(59%)
   

Number and percent of patients

Disclosures: No relevant conflicts of interest to declare.
Logged
Pages: 1 Go Up Print 
« previous next »
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.21 | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!