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Author Topic: hyperplastic bone marrow  (Read 5404 times)
nwalsh528
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« on: January 01, 2012, 06:39:03 PM »

When we chose to adopt our son from China in 2010, his medical file had a gene test which stated 41/42 homozygote mutation, so we were prepared for beta thalassemia. That gene test was repeated after he was in the U.S. and was in fact correct.

There is a little girl in China who we hope to adopt. I have viewed part of her file. The orphanage she resides in, in China, is in an area where there will not be a gene test done (no availability to have it done). I do know she is being transfused monthly. Her file mentions her bone marrow having been tested and the finding is "hyperplastic anemia." THIS IS NOT TO BE CONFUSED WITH HYPOPLASTIC ANEMIA WHICH WOULD INDICATE FAILURE OF BONE MARROW TO PRODUCE RED AND WHITE CELLS AND PLATELETS. Her bloodwork shows the presence of a normal amount of white blood cells and platelets.

My question is, have others ever seen/heard mention of "hyperplastic anemia" or "hyperplastic bone marrow" used to describe what is happening with the bone marrow in a patient with beta thalassemia major,or perhaps an alpha form such as Hemoglobin H Constant Springs?

Thank you,
Nicole
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Nicoler

My son, adopted from China at age 3 in April 2010, has beta thalassemia major.
nwalsh528
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« Reply #1 on: January 01, 2012, 06:41:17 PM »

I should perhaps also mention the bloodwork I have seen shows her hemoglobin around 6 (60) before transfusion and around 9 (90) and 10 (100) afterwards. So, I would expect her bone marrow is very much being activated to produce defective cells (rather than supressed with proper transfusions).
From my limited knowledge, I was thinking that situation would lead itself perhaps to the "hyperplastic" term, but I'm very curious what others think. Thank you!
Nicole
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Nicoler

My son, adopted from China at age 3 in April 2010, has beta thalassemia major.
nwalsh528
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« Reply #2 on: January 02, 2012, 08:19:05 PM »

When we chose to adopt our son from China in 2010, his medical file had a gene test which stated 41/42 homozygote mutation, so we were prepared for beta thalassemia.

I meant to say we were prepared for him to be beta thalassemia major, which he is.
Nicole
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Nicoler

My son, adopted from China at age 3 in April 2010, has beta thalassemia major.
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